TIPS FOR ENSURING A SUCCESSFUL SPRAY FOAM INSTALLATION

Spray foam insulation can keep your house warm and cozy, and lower your electric bills. But in most cases it’s not a do-it-yourself job.

It takes a qualified contractor to properly prepare and apply the foam insulation, both for safety and to ensure the best results.

Here’s some guidance from the Spray Foam Coalition on what to expect from a spray foam insulation contract and while they are on the job.

  • Installation time varies depending on the size of the job and the ease of access to the site. A small amount of SPF applied to a home’s interior can take as little as an hour or two to complete. Small spaces can typically be completed in a day once any prep work is done.
  • While the foam can be sprayed and completed in a matter of hours, people and pets need to remain out of the home for the amount of time recommended by the SPF manufacturer. CT Retrofit foam insulation contractor will limit access to the site to just workers wearing the proper protective equipment.
  • There are a number of variables that affect how long it takes for SPF to cure, including temperature, humidity levels and the SPF’s formula. Homeowners should discuss with their contractor the amount of time they need to wait before re-entering the home.
  • CT Retrofit contractor’s will turn of all gas valves etc. in the area where SPF is being applied, as well as in neighboring rooms and behind walls, such as pilot lights used in natural gas stoves or ovens, furnaces, water heaters and clothes dryers.
  • With proper installation and mechanical ventilation, foam insulation is not odorous after it has been applied and allowed time to cure. If a homeowner is concerned about odors that they think may be related to the Commercial installation, they should contact their contractor.
  • The contractor cleans the work site thoroughly before the homeowners and their pets, children and other service providers re-enter the space.

Can I retrofit my home with spray foam insulation?

All spray foam insulations starts as a liquid that instantly expands to fill between the studs in a wall cavity or ceiling joists. Most of these expanding foam insulations, like air sealing or attic insulation by CT Retrofit Foam Insulation Company must be installed in an open cavity. Because of that, you can’t re-insulate existing walls with these products unless you are doing a complete renovation and opening the walls or ceilings.

But you can still retrofit your home with spray foam insulation in a couple of different ways:

Insulate your crawlspace

Create a conditioned or closed crawlspace by adding spray foam insulation to the walls and adding mechanical ventilation. This seals and insulates the crawlspace, which helps keep the temperatures more moderate in the area. Many times this can help reduce drafts and cold floors in the interior of the home because the living space is now on top of a semi-conditioned space.

Seal off a vented crawlspace by adding spray foam insulation to the crawlspace ceiling. The insulation is applied in direct contact with the underside of the sub floor, not to the walls. This essentially seals the crawlspace from home which can reduce drafts and cold floors in the interior of the home.

Insulate your attic

Create a conditioned or closed attic by adding spray foam insulation to the underside of the roof deck and the rafters and removing vents in the attic. This seals and insulates the attic, which helps keep the temperatures more moderate, usually only about a 10-15 degree temperature difference from the inside of the home. Having a semi-conditioned space over your conditioned space will improve the overall comfort in your living spaces, and if your ducts run through the attic, it will increase the efficiency of your HVAC unit.

Seal off an unconditioned or vented attic by adding spray foam insulation between the joists in the attic floors and an ignition or thermal barrier to meet your local building codes. This also would involve removing the existing insulation in the attic. As with a vented crawlspace, this seals the attic off from the rest of the home to help prevent air leaks and increase the comfort of your home.

Seal your HVAC ducts

You can seal your HVAC ducts with spray foam insulation to prevent unconditioned air from the attic or crawlspace from leaking into the ducts and conditioned air from escaping through holes in your ducts. This can improve the efficiency of your HVAC unit and increase the comfort of your home.

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Call Rhode Island Retrofit at 401.217.4055 or visit us online at riretrofit.com

We Answer Your Insulation FAQ

Find immediate answers to your questions with these home and building insulation FAQs.

Q: What type of insulation do I need?

A: The type of insulation you need depends on where it will be installed, what R-values are required, and your budget.The U.S. Department of Energy recommends different R-values for different zones. In Florida, a homeowner can get away with using R30 in their attic, whereas the same home in Rhode Island would require higher levels of insulation or a higher R-value.

Q: What is loose-fill fiberglass?

A: Loose-fill fiberglass insulation is typically blown into unfinished attics, nonconforming spaces and hard-to-reach areas, as this effectively fills all the nooks and crannies of the framing bay. Loose-fill, also known as blown-in insulation, provides better performance than batts because it is much less likely to leave any gaps.

Q: What is an R-value?

A: “R” stands for resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power and in turn, your energy savings. As mentioned previously, determining the R-value for your residence depends greatly on where it will be installed, and your budget.

Q: Are there rebates or other incentives available for insulation projects?

A: Yes! Government agencies, utilities, and others offer a variety of tax credits and other incentives to support energy-saving upgrades.

Q: Can insulation help increase my home’s property value?

A: Yes! Adding insulation to your attic can generate a return on investment should you ever decide to sell your home. This project may also reduce your heating and cooling costs by up to 30 percent and make you eligible for a federal tax credit.

Q: How can we find an insulation contractor?

A: The best course of action is to contact Rhode Island Retrofit. When you call, you will be greeted by a member of our friendly staff who will assist you with your energy efficiency project, and help you investigate and receive any applicable insulation rebates.
Call Rhode Island Retrofit at 401.217.4055 or visit us online at superiorinsulationservices.com

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Call Rhode Island Retrofit for a free home consultation now and start getting more comfortable in your home.

Air Sealing

While it’s well-known that homes require insulation to mitigate heat loss through walls, ceilings and floors, the concept of air sealing is often less understood. superiorinsulationservices.com

Air leaks occur when outside air enters and conditioned air leaves your house uncontrollably through cracks and openings. In addition to wasting energy, air leaks may contribute to moisture problems, and poor indoor air quality.

Air sealing will save you money on heating and cooling costs, improve system longevity, and increase occupant comfort. It will also help to create a healthier indoor environment. Air sealing doesn’t require much effort, and is generally very cost-productive.

Air Sealing Measures

Some measures you can do yourself include In RI:

Caulking around windows and doors
Installing foam gaskets behind outlet and switch plates
Installing weatherstripping around windows and doors (include the garage door)
Replacing door bottoms (thresholds) with those that feature pliable gaskets
Other sources of air leaks, such as attic and lighting fixture penetrations, are best addressed by a professional. Before beginning any of these measures, it is a good idea to have a comprehensive energy audit performed, which includes both a visual inspection and thermal imaging scan. An energy audit can detect cold spots, air leaks and intrusion, energy-hogging appliances, and insufficient insulation levels.

Save with Energy Upgrade Rebates

Good news! There are several energy upgrade rebates available that make air sealing substantially more affordable. Eligible homeowners can recoup a large sum of their project costs. Call Rhode Island Retrofit at 401.217.4055 or visit us online at riretrofit.com

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Call Rhode Island Retrofit for a free home consultation now and start getting more comfortable in your home.

Get Your Home Ready for Spring: Make Your Home Energy Efficient

“Spring has sprung”…as they say. For many, this means great weather and finally being able to be outdoors more. For others, spring is the time of year for cleaning and home improvements, especially because the heat of summer is right around the corner. The more you get done when temperatures are mild, the less you’ll have to do when it’s extra-hot outside. And if you take care of these five sections of your home now, you can take advantage of increased energy efficiency all year.

1) Bedroom

Even though you sleep most of the time you’re here, this is still a very important room. During the hot months, many people crank up the air conditioner just so they can be comfortable when they sleep. This wastes a lot of energy, and this is reflected in increased energy bills. That is where the ceiling fan comes into play.
Ceiling fans help circulate cool air in the summer by pushing cooled air downward. And in the winter, you can reverse the blade direction to push the cool air upward and mix with the warm air. By doing this, you’re able to be cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter while saving some energy.

Quick energy saving tip: A ceiling fan cools people, but not the room itself. It’s only cooling the body, so leaving a fan on when you’re not in the room only wastes electricity. So, save more energy and remember to turn it (and any lights or electronics) off when leaving the room.

Another easy improvement is with a Ductless Mini Split SystemYou can lower your cooling and heating bills my having a ductless system in your home. Ductless systems are great for homeowners that want to reduce their energy bill and for homeowners whom have older houses and didn’t have central air put installed originally. Learn more about a Rhode Island Retrofit Ductless AC System now.

2) Attic

For a home improvement project that creates instant improvements to your energy efficiency, we recommend adding insulation in your attic. Your energy savings will depend on how much insulation is already in your attic and how old it is.
Insulation helps save energy because it acts as a barrier that keeps heat in during the winter and heat out during the summer. In order to maximize the efficiency of adding insulation, it’s best to air seal your attic to prevent air leaks first before adding the insulation. You can do this by sealing, caulking and weather stripping all seams, cracks, and openings to the outside in your attic.

The main sources of air leaks in your attic are around the chimney flashing, all HVAC ducts, the attic entrance, any recessed lighting, and a dropped ceiling. Once the air leaks are filled, then it’s time for the insulation to be added. To determine if your home needs insulation, you can either hire a trained Energy Specialist from Rhode Island Retrofit who will do an entire home energy assessment for you or you can inspect it yourself.

 

If you do decide to do the inspection yourself, you need to determine the following:

Where your home needs to be insulated,
The thickness and the R-value of your current insulation, and
The type of insulation you already have. The R-value is a measurement for insulation’s resistance to heat flow and the higher the value the greater the effectiveness.

3) Kitchen

An easy way to give your kitchen a face-lift and make it energy efficient is to upgrade your appliances. For example, by replacing an older refrigerator with an Energy Star labeled model, you can use 40% less energy than conventional models sold in 2001 or earlier. Just think how nice your kitchen will look and how much lower your electric bill could be by replacing all your kitchen appliances with new Energy Star models.

In addition to updating your appliances, you can also replace all lighting in the kitchen with LED light bulbs which use less energy and create less heat, which is especially helpful when cooking during the hotter months.

If you aren’t looking to upgrade your kitchen but are interested in ways to save energy and cut down on your energy bill, here are a few energy saving tips for the kitchen:

Use pressure cookers or microwave ovens instead of the stove. They will save energy and reduce cooking time.
If you do use the oven, try to cook several items at the same time. Also, don’t open the door to peek in; opening the door can lower the temperature inside up to 25 degrees.
Only run a full dishwasher but be sure it’s not overloaded.
Let your dishes air dry. There should be an automatic air-dry option but if not, then turn off the dishwasher after the final rinse and open the door to let the moisture escape.
Allow foods to partially cool before putting them in the refrigerator since it takes more energy to cool hot food.

4) Living Room

An easy, but pricey, way to help with your energy bills is to upgrade your electronics with models that have received the “Energy Star” rating. This labeling showcases devices that reduce energy consumption without reducing the quality of the product.

Quick energy saving tip: Remember to turn off lights and electronics when you’re not using them. Opposite to what you might expect, even in stand-by mode those items still consume electricity unless they are completely shut off.

If you are looking for less expensive options, just like in the bedroom, you can adopt the same tips for the living room as well. Use/install a ceiling fan and switch to LED lighting.

 

5) Throughout the Home

It can be beneficial to update all windows and doors leading to the outside. If you have older single-paned windows, chances are you have leaks in them, which means conditioned air is escaping through the leaks and outside air is coming in through them as well.

A simple fix would be to replace those windows with new, double-paned windows that are much more energy efficient and labeled “Energy Star”. This method is costly, but they can add better curb appeal to your home plus can reduce air loss of up to 50%.

If replacing windows is not the option for you, then you can add caulking and/or weather stripping to reduce air leakage. Determine where the air leaks are by inspecting windows and/or doors to feel any air coming through. Once located, apply caulk to fill in the gaps.

Lastly, if you do not have curtains or window coverings, it is a good idea to add them. By keeping them closed during the hottest part of the day, it will help block out the sun and keep your room cooler in the warmer months and they add a nice decorative touch.

 

 

6) Garage

The garage is probably one of the last places people think to make improvements to or make energy efficient. What many people don’t realize is the garage (especially if it is attached to the home) can be one of the largest culprits of air loss in your home.

One of the easiest ways to help prevent this loss is to add weather stripping to the bottom of the garage door and the door leading from the garage into your home. This prevents the outside air from coming in and the air conditioned air from escaping – and as a bonus – it acts as a cushion for the garage door, which cuts down on noise when closed. If you feel a breeze on the sides of the garage door, this is a clue you need to add weather stripping tape to seal the leaks.

Lastly, many people have a refrigerator or freezer in the garage for extra storage. This becomes a problem if you live in an area that has extreme high and low temperatures. Keeping the fridge/freezer at the proper temperature in extremely hot weather causes it to work harder. This is tough on the appliance AND it uses more energy, which costs you more money. So, if you are set on having another fridge or freezer in your garage, then think about replacing it with a model that is built “garage-friendly” and can withstand extreme temperatures.

If your interested in having an Energy Assessment performed on your home by Rhode Island Retrofit fill out or contact form today to the right or call us at now by clicking the button below.

The Three Most Important Things To Make Your Home More Comfortable

One of the most expensive aspects of being a homeowner is spending money heating and cooling your home. It can sometimes be a grind and trying to find that perfect comfort level in your home. As we all know New England winters and summers can be very unpredictable.
As homeowners we look for every advantage to achieve this comfort level while at the same time trying to save money on our energy cost. This is especially true during the winter months, hence the large and ever growing market for winterization products. Whether it be plastic wrap around the windows, extra weather stripping, or even a door sweep or two, we have experimented and tried it all in hopes of saving energy and finding that perfect comfort level during winter. But one very important place we often forget to consider for energy savings is our crawl spaces.

As many of us know, our crawl space is a dark, damp, musty, and often times a nasty place underneath our home. It is a naturally wet and damp environment due to moisture constantly escaping out of the dirt floor or moving through our porous foundation walls. This wet, damp air in our crawl space eventually makes it’s way up into our living areas because of a process known as stack effect. As the dry, heated air rises and moves up and out of our home it is replaced by the damp, wet air from the crawl space. Wet, moist air is harder to heat and cool. This means the wet, moist air making it’s way into the living area causes our furnaces to work much harder to reach our comfort level.

Excessive moisture in the crawl space isn’t the only thing causing us to have higher energy cost during winter. Cold outside air coming into the crawl space also causes higher than needed energy cost. This cold, outside air makes it’s way into the crawl space via vents, porous foundation walls, and gaps or cracks throughout the structure of the crawl space foundation. This negative, cold air causes cold floors in the living area. And if your crawl space is like mine and contains all your homes duct work, then it puts an even bigger burden on your furnace. The heated air produced by your furnace begins to be cooled down as it travels through the duct work due to the cold air moving into the crawl space and around these ducts. Your furnace ends up working much harder to maintain right amount of heat, thus causing more energy loss.

There are a few simple steps you can take concerning the health of your crawl space that can go a long way in saving you money on energy.

1. Check moisture levels in your crawl space.

This can be done by a simple, quick inspection of your crawl space and a small moisture meter. If your unable to inspect your crawl space, call a local crawl space contractor. Many times these contractors perform inspections free of charge. If standing water is noticed than the moisture reader is probably not necessary. The moisture reader will come in handy if in fact you do not see standing water. Many crawl spaces can have very high levels of moisture in the air and not have standing water. Typically you want the moisture levels in your crawl space to be around 50% or less. To reduce standing water or high levels or moisture in your crawl space a sump pump, drainage system, new vapor barrier, or encapsulation system may be needed. In some case all of the above may be needed.

2. Insure that your crawl space vents are correct.

Opened crawl space vents during the winter months causes larger amounts of cold air to enter your crawl space. Likewise, during the summer months these open vents can cause warm, wet air to enter your crawl space. So the question becomes, “Do I close my vents year round, or open them during warmer months and close them during colder months?” And the answer is both yes and no. The best way to reduce energy loss caused by your crawl space is to seal your crawl space off completely from the outside environment. This is done with acrawl space encapsulation system. Only after a crawl space encapsulation is installed would I recommend permanently sealing your vents off. Without a crawl space encapsulation system I would recommend only sealing your vents off during the winter months. Doing so during the summer without a crawl space encapsulation system can lead to stagnant, musty, smelly air coming up into your living areas.

3. Check the insulation in your crawl space.

Also, check the insulation in your attic. Over time insulation in a crawl space can become heavy due to absorbing moisture and falling. Not only does this cause a problem with energy loss but can also lead to possible mold growth. A properly insulated crawl space and attic can greatly reduce heat loss during those cold winter months.
Your crawl space doesn’t have to keep costing you more money on energy. Taking these steps can greatly improve the health of your crawl space and living area, along with reducing your energy cost.

 

 

If you questions about your homes crawl space give the local leaders at Rhode Island Retrofit a call at 401.217.4055 now or fill out a contact form and we’ll call you!

Home Insulation FAQ’s

Q: What type of insulation do I need?

A: The type of insulation you need actually depends on where it needs to be installed, what R-values are required, and your budget. The U.S. Department of Energy recommends different R-values for different zones.

Q: What is loose-fill fiberglass?

A: Loose-fill fiberglass insulation is usually blown into unfinished attics, nonconforming spaces and hard-to-reach areas, as this effectively fills all the hard to reach area of the framing bay. Loose-fill, also known as blown-in insulation, provides better performance than batts because it is much less likely to leave any gaps.

Q: What is an R-value?

A: “R” stands for resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power and in turn, your energy savings. As mentioned previously, determining the R-value for your residence depends greatly on where it will be installed, and your budget.

Q: Are there rebates or other incentives available for insulation projects?

A: Yes! Government agencies, utilities, and others offer a variety of tax credits and other incentives to support energy-saving upgrades.

Q: Can insulation help increase my home’s property value?

A: Yes! Adding insulation to your attic could generate a 107.7% return on investment if you ever decided to sell your home. This project may also reduce your heating and cooling costs by up to 30 percent and make you eligible for a federal tax credit.

Q: How can we find an insulation contractor?

A: The best course of action is to contact Rhode Island Retrofit. When you call we will schedule you for a home consultation to perform an energy consultation and help you investigate and receive any applicable insulation rebates.

Call us at 401.217.4055 or fill out the form below.

Ice Dam Repairs

ICE DAMS: Call Rhode Island Retrofit

An Ice Dam is a hump of ice that forms at the edge of a roof under certain wintertime conditions. An ice dam can damage both your roof and the inside of your home. It will put gutters and downspouts at risk too.

Ice Dams are a common sight in Rhode Island during the winter, and Rhode Island Retrofit has dealt with quite a few. There are several things you can do to avoid getting an ice dam or to reduce the risk of damage after one has formed, but there’s really only one cure: a combination of better air sealing, insulation, and venting in the attic and eaves.

HOW DO ICE DAMS FORM?

An ice dam forms when the roof over the attic gets warm enough to melt the underside of the layer of snow on the roof. The water trickles down between the layer of snow and the shingles until it reaches the eave of the roof, which stays cold because it extends beyond the side of the house. There, the water freezes, gradually growing into a mound of ice.

The flatter the pitch of the roof, the easier it is for an ice dam to get a grip. Gutters at the eaves can also trap snow and ice. If snow and ice build up high enough in the gutter, it can provide a foundation for an ice dam.

WHAT DAMAGE DO ICE DAMS CAUSE?

When an ice dam gets big enough, melted water backs up behind it and seeps underneath the shingles. Eventually, it will drip into the insulation and down into the ceilings and exterior walls beneath the eave, ruining sheetrock and paint. If the ice dam breaks free, it can pull shingles and gutters off with it, and it will damage anything it falls on: shrubs, windowsills, cars, pets, and people. If the roof sheathing stays wet, it can form mildew and start to rot.

HOW CAN YOU DEAL WITH ICE DAMS?

There are two avenues of attack: dealing with an existing ice dam and preventing one in the first place.

DEALING WITH EXISTING ICE DAMS

1. Remove the ice dam by breaking it free in small chucks. Do NOT use an ax or other sharp tool! You’ll cut through the shingles. Instead, tap lightly with a blunt mallet. This is slow, dangerous work, so hire someone experienced at roofing like Connecticut Retrofit. Even if you do it safely, the chunks of ice can take pieces of shingle with them.

2. Clear out gutters and downspouts. Again, this is ladder work and an easy way to damage either plastic or metal gutters and spouts.

3. Melt troughs through the ice dam with calcium chloride ice melter. Do NOT use rock salt! It will damage paint, metals, and plants beneath the eave and wherever the salty water drains.

A good trough-maker is a tube of cloth (a leg from an old pair of panty hose works well). Fill it with calcium chloride, tie off the top, and lay it vertically across the ice dam. It will slowly melt its way down through the dam, clearing a path for the underlying water to flow free.

PREVENTING ICE DAMS

You can scrape snow from the roof whenever it falls, using a snow rake from below or a broom or plastic shovel from above. BE CAREFUL: The first method can bury you in snow, while the second can send you slipping off the roof. Hire someone who knows how to use a safety line.

You can replace your shingle roof with standing seam or other metal roof. Or you can replace the bottom three feet or so of your shingle roof with a wide metal drip edge. Whatever you do, install a water-repellant membrane under any new roofing.

NOTE: If your roof is not very steep, an ice dam can still form on metal roofing and drip edges.

HOW TO FIX ICE DAMS

All of these methods treat the symptoms, not the underlying problem, which is the warm roof, caused by poor insulation and venting of the space under the roof. We have found that the only way to cure an ice dam – and prevent one in the first place – is to:

1. Seal all points where warm air leaks from the living space into the spaces immediately below the roof sheathing.

2. Insulate the living space well enough to prevent conduction and convection of heat through the ceiling.

3. Vent the space between the insulation and the roof sheathing, so any heat that does leak through is carried away.

Call the Ice Dam experts at Rhode Island Retrofit today to fix your Ice Dams.

 

Why Is Attic Insulation So Important?

Homeowners should already be well aware of the fact that heat within a home flows from the warmer areas to the cooler ones. If an attic is not properly insulated, this means warm air is able to seep in from the outdoors and disrupt your cool interior on hot summer days. It also means that cool air is able to make its way inside during the winter months, putting a damper on your home”s inner warmth.

By allowing cool and hot air to escape, you are also increasing your energy costs each month. For maximum heating and cooling power, in addition to a serious reduction in energy costs, it is important to have your attic insulated. Attic insulation is crucial, because the heat in your home rises to the top and can exit through the ceiling when the attic”s ventilation has not been properly addressed.

The savings you will experience on your energy costs are no small potatoes, either. A properly insulated attic can slice energy costs in half immediately and the savings can reach as high as 70 percent. Instead of allowing your valuable cool or warm air to seep out through cracks in the attic”s ceiling, you can ensure that your home remains at the temperature you have selected.

Any time you make a dramatic change online casino to the temperature of your home, this is reflected in your increased costs. When you burn off useful energy in order to keep your home”s temperature at your chosen level, the air conditioning and heating units also experience a major strain, which can lead to their breakdown.

As anyone who has ever had to shell out their hard earned income for repairs to these systems can tell you, they certainly do not come cheap. Not only can an insulated attic save you money on your energy costs, but it can also keep you from having to dip into your savings for a brand new heating or cooling system.

One of the most common issues that a homeowner experiences is an inability to maintain desired air flow throughout the home. Insulation not only seals off cracks and crevices, but it also serves as a method for trapping the air inside and preventing it from exiting the domicile.

When choosing insulation for an attic, it is pivotal to select a brand that provides a high amount of thermal resistance (R-value). Insulation that has a high R-value is better at keeping the air in your attic from moving to a different area of the home.

An insulated attic enables a homeowner to keep their residence at their preferred temperature, without experiencing higher energy costs or damage to their heating and cooling systems. Not only is an insulated attic recommended, but you will wonder how you lived for so long without one.

Call Rhode Island Retrofit now to get your attic insulated and get you living in a more comfortable environment. Call 401.217.4055 Now!

Reasons Why You Should Insulate An Old Home

There are many reasons why you should insulate an old house. A lot of houses before the 1960s do not have any kind of insulation. The reason is that energy costs were so low that people didn’t think they needed to save money on heating and cooling their house.

If you enjoy your house and want to feel more comfortable in the different seasons of the year then this is one of the best reasons to insulate your old house. An old house can be very cold and drafty in the winter and very hot and overbearing in the summer. The idea of being comfortable during the seasons gives you peace of mind knowing you will get full enjoyment from one season to the next.

To keep your house warm you need to stop the air from flowing out of your house. You can do this by adding insulation with a good “R” value. The R value represents the thickness of your insulation. Purchasing insulation with more thickness is going to keep more and more air from leaving the house.

The same with summertime do you notice how hot your attic is. The hot air has accumulated there because of the rising air. By keeping your attic cooler your whole house is going to stay cooler with the proper cooling system. Installing insulation in the walls of the old house will keep you much more comfortable in all seasons.

Another good reason to insulate your old house is to save you money on your energy costs. Keeping air from moving into and out of your house saves you money. In the summer you save by having insulation because this barrier blocks out any air coming through the walls, attic and other areas of the house. Having insulation keeps the temperature in your house at a more constant level. You therefore spend less money having the air conditioner not coming on as much leading to a savings in your utility costs.

People with old houses before 1960 didn’t have to worry about the changing energy costs that happened more in the Seventies. Today if you want to save money with your old house you’re going to need some insulation. There is just too much air going through your walls. Installing some installation is going to keep the exchange of inside and outside air to a minimum.

Another good reason to insulate your old house is to reduce the noise level that is coming from the outside. More peace and quiet while you are in your home can be a great reason to start adding some insulation. Adding insulation doesn’t mean tearing down your old inside walls, unless you’re changing the layout of the home. There is a way of adding the insulation from the outside of the house.

Making sure your old house has insulation in the attic. This is a great place to start since this is where the majority of the air escapes or comes into the house. Keeping up on your old home’s insulation can save you money and make you much more comfortable.
For the very best insulation company and insulation services in Rhode Island call Rhode Island Retrofit today at 401.217.4055.

Adding Attic Insulation Will Make Your Home More Comfortable

Did you notice you had a draft home with the recent weather? Did you know with a draft home you are costing yourself hundreds of dollars a year? By installing attic insulation, you give yourself the largest opportunities to save energy in your home, as well as maintain a comfortable temperature throughout the home. Whether it is summer or winter, adding attic insulation makes your house a lot more comfortable, while saving you some much needed money.

Remodeling magazine’s 2016 Cost vs. Value report suggest adding attic insulation is the #1 home improvement project with the best return on investment (ROI). In fact, attic insulation was the only home improvement project to provide over a 100% return on investment, recouping you roughly 116.9%.

There are also several tax credits you should be aware of. According to ENERGY STAR, typical bulk insulation products like those mentioned below, qualify for a federal tax credit amount of 10% of the cost; up to $500. This tax credit is available for purchases made in 2016.

 

Everyone qualifies for the energy tax credit as long as its primary purpose is to a) insulate your home and b) bring your home up to the recommended R-value guidelines.

Products that reduce air leaks such as weather stripping, canned spray foam, caulk designed specifically for air sealing, and house wrap also qualify for these tax credits as long as they come with a Manufacturers Certification Statement. Professional installation costs are NOT included.

Should I Invest in Attic Insulation?

If your house is experiencing any of the following symptoms, you should consider adding insulation to your home’s attic space, along with its interior walls, floors, and crawl spaces.

  • Drafty rooms.
  • Hot or cold ceilings or walls.
  • High heating or cooling costs.
  • Uneven temperatures between rooms.
  • Ice dams in the winter (where applicable)

 

Determining Proper Insulation R-Values

Understanding an insulation material’s R-value – a measure of how well it resists the flow of heat – is very important. The higher the number, the better the insulating power, and the more energy you will save. If your home is not properly insulated – which is often the case in with RI Insulation – the higher your energy bills will be.

Recommended R-values are 30 to 60 for most attic spaces, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, with R-38 (or about 12 to 15 inches, depending on material type) being considered the “sweet spot.

Professional Insulation Installation by Rhode Island Retrofit

As a locally owned and operated insulation contractor, servicing the entire state of RI, we take great pride in all aspects of our work and servicing you. We specialize in both residential and commercial insulation installs. No job is ever too big or small for us to handle and we happily provide free in-home estimates. We look forward to hearing from you. Call use 860. 238.3112 or visit us online at www.riretrofit.com